Key Facts about the Conference

  • Amazing plenary speakers;
  • Open-access conference proceedings indexed in WoS - ITM Web conferences;
  • Lunch each day, twice daily coffee/tea on site, drinks reception, gala dinner, and Amsterdam canal tour included in the conference fee;
  • Academic ICT products and infrastructure projects will be presented;
  • An award and prize (500 euros in goods) will be granted to the best conference paper presenter, as well as to the ICT tools quiz winner
Key Facts about the Conference

Important Dates

  • Dates of the conference: June 29th – July 1st, 2020
  • Deadline for abstract submission: November 29th, 2019 December 7th, 2019
  • Notification of acceptance: January 31st, 2020
  • Deadline for workshop/training proposal submission: January 15th, 2020
  • Early bird registration: March 31st, 2020
  • Regular registration: May 31st, 2020
Important Dates

Keynote Speakers

We are glad to announce amazing keynote speakers! 

Move mouse over pictures below to read short biographies of keynote speakers.

Loet LeydesdorffHow Are “Big Data” a Challenge to the Social Sciences?

Loet Leydesdorff (Ph.D. Sociology, M.A. Philosophy, and M.Sc. Biochemistry) is Professor emeritus at the Amsterdam School of Communications Research (ASCoR) of the University of Amsterdam.

He has published extensively in systems theory, social network analysis, scientometrics, and the sociology of innovation (see at http://www.leydesdorff.net/list.htm or http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=ych9gNYAAAAJ&hl=en).

With Henry Etzkowitz, he initiated a series of workshops, conferences,
and special issues about the Triple Helix of University-Industry-Government Relations.

He received the Derek de Solla Price Award for Scientometrics and Informetrics in 2003 and held “The City of Lausanne” Honor Chair at the School of Economics, Université de Lausanne, in 2005.

In 2007, he was Vice-President of the 8th International Conference on Computing Anticipatory Systems (CASYS’07, Liège).

Since 2014, he is listed as a highly-cited author by the ISI at https://clarivate.com/hcr/

ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7835-3098

ResearcherID:
E-2903-2010; Author
ID (Scopus): 7003954276

Google Scholar user profile at https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=ych9gNYAAAAJ&hl=en

Loet LeydesdorffHow Are “Big Data” a Challenge to the Social Sciences?

Loet Leydesdorff (Ph.D. Sociology, M.A. Philosophy, and M.Sc. Biochemistry) is Professor emeritus at the Amsterdam School of Communications Research (ASCoR) of the University of Amsterdam.

He has published extensively in systems theory, social network analysis, scientometrics, and the sociology of innovation (see at http://www.leydesdorff.net/list.htm or http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=ych9gNYAAAAJ&hl=en).

With Henry Etzkowitz, he initiated a series of workshops, conferences,
and special issues about the Triple Helix of University-Industry-Government Relations.

He received the Derek de Solla Price Award for Scientometrics and Informetrics in 2003 and held “The City of Lausanne” Honor Chair at the School of Economics, Université de Lausanne, in 2005.

In 2007, he was Vice-President of the 8th International Conference on Computing Anticipatory Systems (CASYS’07, Liège).

Since 2014, he is listed as a highly-cited author by the ISI at https://clarivate.com/hcr/

ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7835-3098

ResearcherID:
E-2903-2010; Author
ID (Scopus): 7003954276

Google Scholar user profile at https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=ych9gNYAAAAJ&hl=en

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Anneke ZuiderwijkOpen Research Data sharing and use by means of infrastructural and institutional arrangements

Dr. Anneke Zuiderwijk is an Assistant Professor in open data at the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Her research is focused on the development of theory that explains how, why and when infrastructural and institutional arrangements can incentivize open data sharing and use behavior by governments, researchers, companies and citizens. During her PhD Anneke developed a theory for the development of open government data infrastructures, which she also transformed into advice for open data policy-makers. Several elements of her theory have been implemented in international projects, including FP7 ENGAGE (2014) and H2020 VRE4EIC (2018). Anneke obtained her PhD with distinction, only awarded to the top 5% of TU Delft PhD candidates. In 2016, she received the international Digital Governance Junior Scholar Award and she was ranked as one of the most influential open data researchers worldwide (link).
Anneke served as a conference programme chair (dg.o2018, dg.o2019), conference chair (I3E-2015), associate chair (OpenSym2017), associate editor (ICIS2019) and track chair (CeDEM2014; 2015, 2016, 2017, EGOV-CeDEM-ePART2018, 2019). The importance of her research was also emphasized through best paper awards she received at important conferences in her field of information science (EGOV2012, Dg.o2014). Finally, she is co-founder of three online courses: Open Data professional
education (53 experts), Open Science MOOC (1,500+ participants from 100+ countries) and Open Government MOOC (nearly 10,000 participants from 150+ countries). More information about Anneke’s publications, online courses, projects and activities can be found at Anneke’s TU Delft web page and Google Scholar

Anneke ZuiderwijkOpen Research Data sharing and use by means of infrastructural and institutional arrangements

Dr. Anneke Zuiderwijk is an Assistant Professor in open data at the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Her research is focused on the development of theory that explains how, why and when infrastructural and institutional arrangements can incentivize open data sharing and use behavior by governments, researchers, companies and citizens. During her PhD Anneke developed a theory for the development of open government data infrastructures, which she also transformed into advice for open data policy-makers. Several elements of her theory have been implemented in international projects, including FP7 ENGAGE (2014) and H2020 VRE4EIC (2018). Anneke obtained her PhD with distinction, only awarded to the top 5% of TU Delft PhD candidates. In 2016, she received the international Digital Governance Junior Scholar Award and she was ranked as one of the most influential open data researchers worldwide (link).
Anneke served as a conference programme chair (dg.o2018, dg.o2019), conference chair (I3E-2015), associate chair (OpenSym2017), associate editor (ICIS2019) and track chair (CeDEM2014; 2015, 2016, 2017, EGOV-CeDEM-ePART2018, 2019). The importance of her research was also emphasized through best paper awards she received at important conferences in her field of information science (EGOV2012, Dg.o2014). Finally, she is co-founder of three online courses: Open Data professional
education (53 experts), Open Science MOOC (1,500+ participants from 100+ countries) and Open Government MOOC (nearly 10,000 participants from 150+ countries). More information about Anneke’s publications, online courses, projects and activities can be found at Anneke’s TU Delft web page and Google Scholar

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Sören AuerFrom papers to knowledge: Representing scientific contributions in the Open Research Knowledge Graph

Following stations at the universities of Dresden, Ekaterinburg, Leipzig, Pennsylvania, Bonn and the Fraunhofer Society, Prof. Auer was appointed Professor of Data Science and Digital Libraries at Leibniz Universität Hannover and Director of the TIB in 2017. Prof. Auer has made important contributions to semantic technologies, knowledge engineering and information systems. He is the author (resp. co-author) of over 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications. He has received several awards, including an ERC Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council, a SWSA ten-year award, the ESWC 7-year Best Paper Award, and the OpenCourseware Innovation Award. He has led several large collaborative research projects, such as the EU H2020 flagship project BigDataEurope. He is co-founder of high potential research and community projects such as the Wikipedia semantification project DBpedia, the OpenCourseWare authoring platform SlideWiki.org and the innovative technology start-up eccenca.com. Prof. Auer was founding director of the Big Data Value Association, led the semantic data representation in the Industrial/International Data Space, is an expert for industry, European Commission, W3C and member of the advisory board of the Open Knowledge Foundation.

The research focus - with special attention on semantic data interlinking for artificial intelligence - are in the following areas:

  • Data Science, Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Representation, Engineering & Management
  • Information Systems, Databases, Data Integration, Linked Data, Semantic and Web Technologies
  • Software and Systems Engineering, data-driven Platforms, Web Engineering
  • Enterprise Integration, Semantically enhanced Service Oriented Architectures
  • Digital Libraries, E-Science, Science Governance, Peer-Review, Open Access
  • Semantic Data Integration for Engineering & Manufacturing (Industry 4.0), Mobility and Built Environment (Smart Cities), Digital Libraries & Research Infrastructures 

Information about current publications, projects and activities of Prof. Auer can be found in the TIB research information system, as well as at ORCIDDBLPGoogle ScholarLinkedInTwitterVideolecturesSlideshareGitHub.

Sören AuerFrom papers to knowledge: Representing scientific contributions in the Open Research Knowledge Graph

Following stations at the universities of Dresden, Ekaterinburg, Leipzig, Pennsylvania, Bonn and the Fraunhofer Society, Prof. Auer was appointed Professor of Data Science and Digital Libraries at Leibniz Universität Hannover and Director of the TIB in 2017. Prof. Auer has made important contributions to semantic technologies, knowledge engineering and information systems. He is the author (resp. co-author) of over 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications. He has received several awards, including an ERC Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council, a SWSA ten-year award, the ESWC 7-year Best Paper Award, and the OpenCourseware Innovation Award. He has led several large collaborative research projects, such as the EU H2020 flagship project BigDataEurope. He is co-founder of high potential research and community projects such as the Wikipedia semantification project DBpedia, the OpenCourseWare authoring platform SlideWiki.org and the innovative technology start-up eccenca.com. Prof. Auer was founding director of the Big Data Value Association, led the semantic data representation in the Industrial/International Data Space, is an expert for industry, European Commission, W3C and member of the advisory board of the Open Knowledge Foundation.

The research focus - with special attention on semantic data interlinking for artificial intelligence - are in the following areas:

  • Data Science, Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Representation, Engineering & Management
  • Information Systems, Databases, Data Integration, Linked Data, Semantic and Web Technologies
  • Software and Systems Engineering, data-driven Platforms, Web Engineering
  • Enterprise Integration, Semantically enhanced Service Oriented Architectures
  • Digital Libraries, E-Science, Science Governance, Peer-Review, Open Access
  • Semantic Data Integration for Engineering & Manufacturing (Industry 4.0), Mobility and Built Environment (Smart Cities), Digital Libraries & Research Infrastructures 

Information about current publications, projects and activities of Prof. Auer can be found in the TIB research information system, as well as at ORCIDDBLPGoogle ScholarLinkedInTwitterVideolecturesSlideshareGitHub.

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Nees Jan van EckVisual exploration of scientific literature using VOSviewer and CitNetExplorer

Dr. Nees Jan van Eck is senior researcher at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies
(CWTS) at Leiden University in the Netherlands. He is doing research in the field of bibliometrics and scientometrics. His research focuses on the development of visualization tools and algorithms,
mainly for analyzing the structure and development of science. Nees Jan is the main developer of VOSviewer and CitNetExplorer, two well-known software tools for visualizing bibliometric data. The VOSviewer software is frequently used in bibliometric studies. More than 1000 publications have appeared in international scientific journals in which the software is employed. In addition to his work on bibliometric visualization, Nees Jan also focuses on the study of bibliometric data sources and the analysis of the full text of scientific publications. Nees Jan has published more than 50 publications. He is editor brief communications of the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, he serves in the editorial boards of Journal of Data and Information Science and Quantitative Science Studies, and he is an elected board member of the International Society for Informetrics and Scientometrics. Nees Jan has been involved in various commercial bibliometric research projects and training courses in which the VOSviewer software plays a key role. He is also the head of ICT of CWTS, making him responsible for the entire data infrastructure of the center.

Nees Jan van EckVisual exploration of scientific literature using VOSviewer and CitNetExplorer

Dr. Nees Jan van Eck is senior researcher at the Centre for Science and Technology Studies
(CWTS) at Leiden University in the Netherlands. He is doing research in the field of bibliometrics and scientometrics. His research focuses on the development of visualization tools and algorithms,
mainly for analyzing the structure and development of science. Nees Jan is the main developer of VOSviewer and CitNetExplorer, two well-known software tools for visualizing bibliometric data. The VOSviewer software is frequently used in bibliometric studies. More than 1000 publications have appeared in international scientific journals in which the software is employed. In addition to his work on bibliometric visualization, Nees Jan also focuses on the study of bibliometric data sources and the analysis of the full text of scientific publications. Nees Jan has published more than 50 publications. He is editor brief communications of the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, he serves in the editorial boards of Journal of Data and Information Science and Quantitative Science Studies, and he is an elected board member of the International Society for Informetrics and Scientometrics. Nees Jan has been involved in various commercial bibliometric research projects and training courses in which the VOSviewer software plays a key role. He is also the head of ICT of CWTS, making him responsible for the entire data infrastructure of the center.

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Brian NosekCrowdsourcing Science

Brian Nosek is co-Founder and Executive Director of the Center for Open Science (http://cos.io/) that operates the Open Science Framework (http://osf.io/). COS is enabling open and reproducible research practices worldwide. Brian is also a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 2002. He co-founded Project Implicit (http://projectimplicit.net/), an multi-university collaboration for research and education investigating implicit cognition--thoughts and feelings that occur outside of awareness or control. Brian investigates the gap between values and practices, such as when behavior is influenced by factors other than one's intentions and goals. Research applications of this interest include implicit bias, decision-making, attitudes, ideology, morality, innovation, and barriers to change. Nosek applies this interest to improve the alignment between personal and organizational values and practices. In 2015, he was named one of Nature's 10 and to the Chronicle for Higher Education Influence list.

Brian NosekCrowdsourcing Science

Brian Nosek is co-Founder and Executive Director of the Center for Open Science (http://cos.io/) that operates the Open Science Framework (http://osf.io/). COS is enabling open and reproducible research practices worldwide. Brian is also a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 2002. He co-founded Project Implicit (http://projectimplicit.net/), an multi-university collaboration for research and education investigating implicit cognition--thoughts and feelings that occur outside of awareness or control. Brian investigates the gap between values and practices, such as when behavior is influenced by factors other than one's intentions and goals. Research applications of this interest include implicit bias, decision-making, attitudes, ideology, morality, innovation, and barriers to change. Nosek applies this interest to improve the alignment between personal and organizational values and practices. In 2015, he was named one of Nature's 10 and to the Chronicle for Higher Education Influence list.

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ICTeSSH Program

This is the preliminary ICTeSSH conference program. The final program will be announced until the end of January 2020.

  • Day 1 29 June 2020
  • Day 2 30 June 2020
  • Day 3 01 July 2020
  • Impact Hub Amsterdam
09:00 AM - 11:00 AMPre-conference workshops and trainings By Chair of PCWOrganization/project

Here will be described pre-conference workshops/trainings

11:00 AM - 12:00 PMRegistration and coffee

Registration of participants

12:00 PM - 12:15 PMOpening By Dragan Ivanovic Tech Investory

ICTeSSH opening

12:15 PM - 01:00 PMHow Are “Big Data” a Challenge to the Social Sciences? By Loet LeydersdorffKeynote speaker

Against the monist programs and philosophies nowadays prevalent, I argue in favor of a dualism between information and meaning. The dynamics of (Shannon-type) information processing and meaning processing are different. In the social sciences, one studies the reflexive processing of meaning. Meaning is provided from the perspective of hindsight (against the arrow of time) and may generate redundancy: options which have not yet been realized. A calculus of redundancy can be envisaged.

Background study:

Leydesdorff, L., Johnson, M. W., & Ivanova, I. (2018). Toward a calculus of redundancy: Signification, codification, and anticipation in cultural evolution.. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 69(10), 1181-1192. doi: 10.1002/asi.24052

01:00 PM - 02:00 PMLunch

Lunch is included in the conference fee

02:00 PM - 03:00 PMParallel Session By PresentersSession 1 chair

Paper from Session 1 will be listed here and their short abstracts

03:00 PM - 03:45 PMCrowdsourcing Science (remote presentation) By Brian NosekKeynote speaker

The standard contributor model in science is vertically integrated. Resources are centralized to an individual or small team that conducts the entire research process: idea, design, collection, analysis, and report. This approach makes it easy to assign credit, but it is inefficient in capitalizing on specialized expertise, it produces a lot of small science, and it is exclusive. A complementary model is horizontally distributed. Crowdsourcing modularizes and distributes the research process across many contributors. This approach leverages expertise, enables big science, and is more inclusive. I will illustrate value of crowdsourcing in the context of a metascience effort investigating reproducibility of psychological research.

03:45 PM - 04:00 PMCoffee break
04:00 PM - 05:30 PMParallel Session By PresentersSessions' chairs
05:30 PM - 06:30 PMDrinks reception

Place where wine reception will be organized

  • Impact Hub Amsterdam
09:00 AM - 10:30 AMParallel Session By Session 2 chairTech Investory

Paper from Session 1 will be listed here and their short abstracts

10:30 AM - 11:00 AMCoffee break
11:00 AM - 11:45 AMOpen Research Data sharing and use by means of infrastructural and institutional arrangements By Anneke ZuiderwijkKeynote speaker

Fully exploiting the opportunities of open research data requires researchers to openly share their data and to use the research data that others have openly shared. Despite existing policies that oblige data sharing (e.g. of scientific funding agencies, the European Commission and universities) researchers are often reluctant to share and use open research data. Previous research already shows that researchers may have very good reasons for not sharing research data openly and for not using open research data, for example because of the fear of not receiving credit for openly sharing research data, because of a lack of skills in open data use or because of technical issues. The majority of obstacles for ORD sharing and use cannot be mitigated completely. Nevertheless, the negative impact of many challenges can be reduced with the right infrastructural and institutional arrangements, as suggested by previous research. This raises the question which infrastructural and institutional arrangements may work in which context, since research disciplines all have their own specific characteristics. In my talk I will discuss various examples of infrastructural and institutional arrangements, derived from my extensive research in open data and open science, and I will explain how they affect research data sharing and use. I will discuss both arrangements that have already been applied in various research disciplines, as well as novel, promising and questionable arrangements for the disciplines of social sciences and humanities. I will highlight questions that still remain to be solved.

11:45 AM - 01:00 PMParallel Session By PresentersSession chair

The list of paper and abstracts

01:00 PM - 02:00 PMLunch

Lunch is included in the conference fee

02:00 PM - 02:45 PMFrom papers to knowledge: Representing scientific contributions in the Open Research Knowledge Graph By Sören AuerKeynote speaker

Despite an improved digital access to scientific publications in the last decades, the fundamental principles of scholarly communication remain unchanged and continue to be largely document-based. The document-oriented workflows in science have reached the limits of adequacy as highlighted by recent discussions on the increasing proliferation of scientific literature, the deficiency of peer-review and the reproducibility crisis. We need to represent, analyse, augment and exploit scholarly communication in a knowledge-based way by expressing and linking scientific contributions and related artefacts through semantically rich, interlinked knowledge graphs. This should be based on deep semantic representation of scientific contributions, their manual, crowd-sourced and automatic augmentation and finally the intuitive exploration and interaction employing question answering on the resulting scientific knowledge base. We need to synergistically combine automated extraction and augmentation techniques, with large-scale collaboration. As a result, knowledge-based information flows can facilitate completely new ways of search and exploration. In this talk we will present first steps in this direction and present some use cases in the context of our Open Research Knowledge Graph initiative and the ERC ScienceGRAPH project.

02:45 PM - 04:45 PMICT products session By Sponsors delegates
04:45 PM - 05:00 PMCoffee break
05:00 PM - 05:30 PMICT products’ quiz By allDragan Ivanovic
08:00 PM - 10:00 PMDinner
  • Impact Hub Amsterdam
09:00 AM - 10:30 AMSSH digital tools’ and infrastructure projects’ presentations By PresentersDragan Ivanovic
10:30 AM - 11:00 AMCoffee break
11:00 AM - 12:00 PMPanel – Usage of ICT tools in SSHDragan Ivanovic

Usage of ICT tools in SSH

12:00 PM - 12:45 PMVisual exploration of scientific literature using VOSviewer and CitNetExplorer By Nees Jan van EckKeynote speaker

It is essential for researchers to have an up-to-date understanding of the literature in their research field. However, keeping up with all relevant literature is highly time consuming. Bibliometric visualizations can support this task. These visualizations provide intuitive overviews of the literature in a research field, enabling researchers to obtain a better understanding of the structure and development of a field and to get an impression of the most significant contributions made in the field.

In this talk, I will give an introduction to two software tools for bibliometric visualization: VOSviewer (www.vosviewer.com) and CitNetExplorer (www.citnetexplorer.nl). VOSviewer is a popular tool for visualizing bibliometric networks of publications, authors, journals, and keywords. CitNetExplorer is a tool for the visualization and analysis of citation networks of scientific publications. I will pay special attention to applications of VOSviewer and CitNetExplorer in the social sciences and humanities, focusing in particular on the use of advanced text mining, network analysis, and visualization techniques for analyzing large amounts of textual data.

12:45 PM - 01:00 PMClosing ceremonyDragan Ivanovic
01:00 PM - 02:00 PMLunch

Lunch is included in the conference fee

02:00 PM - 04:00 PMAmsterdam tour